Liberal Democrats should continue to debate whether to support the Health and Social Care Bill

Despite the welcome and significant changes to the Health & Social Care Bill that Lib Dem parliamentarians have secured, there remain serious concerns both within the party, Parliament and the medical profession about the impact and timing of the reforms.

As the House of Lords prepares for report stage, it is right and proper for the party, from grassroots to leadership, to debate whether the damaging elements of the Bill have been sufficiently tamed, and whether further amendments can be sought in the Lords, to bring the reforms back in line with the Coalition Agreement and party policy as determined at spring conference last year.

The party needs to debate whether in the absence of such further changes, and considering the substantial changes already underway on the NHS front-line, the Bill can retain Lib Dem support – the Social Liberal Forum will continue to support the likes of Graham Winyard, Charles West, Evan Harris and Shirley Williams as they seek to secure that debate.

for further information, please contact prateek.buch@socialliberal.net

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4 comments on “Liberal Democrats should continue to debate whether to support the Health and Social Care Bill
  1. Greg Smyth says:

    My own view is that this bill needs to be killed ASAP, before any more aspects are steamrollered through at ground level on the assumption the bill passes.

    The Parliamentary Party is helping push through a bill with no democratic mandate (Lib Dem, Coalition or even Tory), no grassroots Party support and against the wishes of the majority of medical professionals and public opinion.

    The only sensible debate within the wider party should be when, not if, the Party should kill this bill. If Nick and the Parliamentary Party really believe in this bill, they should take it through the Party’s processes for the next Manifesto.

    I hope the Social Liberal Forum will do all it can to scupper this Westminster Village stitch-up

  2. Andy Maltby says:

    Greg Smyth is absolutely correct.

    Total withdrawl of the bill is the only option. Otherwise any grudging amendments will be reversed by the Government if the bill is allowed to become law.

    Never forget that this bill was born out of deception and lies and that Lansley  will continue to hoodwink anyone he can in order to get it through.

  3. ian allen says:

    As an opposition council group leader I am perplexed as to how I and many others in my position am supposed to maintain any semblance of ‘ Opposition’. While the NHS reforms are not a Council responsibility, they and the other issues around benefit reforms and tuition fees, not to mention local govt cuts sent down from the Coalition, and which we are complicit in approving are killing morale.
    If there was one thing the Lib Dems had going for them it was the high moral ground, no more. Ministerial positions seem to have taken precedence over conference. Presumably we are going to do away with any semblance of collectivity in due course.
    Mr Angry of Ely

  4. I have seen the future (of care of an elderly person with a chronic illness, after the Health and Social Care Bill)

    This describes how the care of my imaginary patient might be affected post-Bill.

    There is also a shorter version on:http://doc2doc.bmj.com/blogs/doctorsblog/_seen-future-of-post-health-social-care-bill-care

    A Nick said “no bill is better than a bad bill”. We will never be forgiven for supporting this risky bill.

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  1. [...] to and who form the majority of the Cabinet members, has caused enough so-called trouble. They have heavily contested the NHS Bill, heavily contested the Welfare Bill and helped to disrupt an entire conference by bringing Hugh [...]

  2. [...] to and who form the majority of the Cabinet members, has caused enough so-called trouble. They have heavily contested the NHS Bill, heavily contested the Welfare Bill and helped to disrupt an entire conference by bringing Hugh [...]

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